Motorcycles in Music — Jeans On by David Dundas

"Serena" was Dundas' sister.

“Serena” was Dundas’ sister.

Jeans On is a mild-mannered mid-70s pop song about the simply joys of getting up, pulling on a pair of blue jeans, climbing on a motorbike, picking up your girlfriend, and spending the day tooling around the back roads.

The song, performed by David Dundas, seems as American as a pair of Levi’s or a Harley-Davidson. It’s anything but.

Lord David Paul Nicholas Dundas, born in Oxfordshire, England, originally wrote the tune as an ad for Brutus Jeans, a brand favored by mods and skinheads and other rowdy soccer fans.

To be fair, the original 1976 ad stopped with the idea of pulling on a pair of Brutus Jeans.  The parts after that (including the motorcycle and girlfriend) were all added for the 1977 single.

The song reached #3 on the UK Singles Chart and #1 in Germany, but only #17 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 Chart. However, it spend a total of 13 weeks in the Billboard’s Top 40, so the song had unusual longevity, probably because of it’s easy-going groove.

Dundas was a one-hit wonder in the U.S., but he had a moderate hit in the UK with his follow-up, Another Funny Honeymoon.  Both songs were included on Dundas’ self-titled album from 1977.

The song gained a second life when it was covered by Australian country-pop singer Keith Urban for his 2002 album, Golden Road.

Lyrics for Jeans On by David Dundas and Roger Greenaway

When I wake up
In the morning light
I pull on my jeans
And I feel all right

I pull my blue jeans on
I pull my old blue jeans on
I pull my blue jeans on
I pull my old blue jeans on

It’s the weekend
And I know that you’re free
So pull on your jeans
And come on out with me

I need to have you near me
I need to feel you close to me
I need to have you near me
I need to feel you close to me

You and me, we’ll go motorbike riding
In the sun and the wind and the rain
I got money in my pocket
Got a tiger in my tank
And I’m king of the road again

I’ll meet you in the usual place
I don’t need a thing
Except your pretty face

I pull my blue jeans on
I pull my old blue jeans on

Lyrics © 1977 Kobalt Music Publishing