Motorcycles in Music — Jeans On by David Dundas

"Serena" was Dundas' sister.

“Serena” was Dundas’ sister.

Jeans On is a mild-mannered mid-70s pop song about the simply joys of getting up, pulling on a pair of blue jeans, climbing on a motorbike, picking up your girlfriend, and spending the day tooling around the back roads.

The song, performed by David Dundas, seems as American as a pair of Levi’s or a Harley-Davidson. It’s anything but.

Lord David Paul Nicholas Dundas, born in Oxfordshire, England, originally wrote the tune as an ad for Brutus Jeans, a brand favored by mods and skinheads and other rowdy soccer fans.

To be fair, the original 1976 ad stopped with the idea of pulling on a pair of Brutus Jeans.  The parts after that (including the motorcycle and girlfriend) were all added for the 1977 single.

The song reached #3 on the UK Singles Chart and #1 in Germany, but only #17 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 Chart. However, it spend a total of 13 weeks in the Billboard’s Top 40, so the song had unusual longevity, probably because of it’s easy-going groove.

Dundas was a one-hit wonder in the U.S., but he had a moderate hit in the UK with his follow-up, Another Funny Honeymoon.  Both songs were included on Dundas’ self-titled album from 1977.

The song gained a second life when it was covered by Australian country-pop singer Keith Urban for his 2002 album, Golden Road.

Lyrics for Jeans On by David Dundas and Roger Greenaway

When I wake up
In the morning light
I pull on my jeans
And I feel all right

I pull my blue jeans on
I pull my old blue jeans on
I pull my blue jeans on
I pull my old blue jeans on

It’s the weekend
And I know that you’re free
So pull on your jeans
And come on out with me

I need to have you near me
I need to feel you close to me
I need to have you near me
I need to feel you close to me

You and me, we’ll go motorbike riding
In the sun and the wind and the rain
I got money in my pocket
Got a tiger in my tank
And I’m king of the road again

I’ll meet you in the usual place
I don’t need a thing
Except your pretty face

I pull my blue jeans on
I pull my old blue jeans on

Lyrics © 1977 Kobalt Music Publishing

Last Train to Soulsville: Revisiting the Stax Museum of American Soul Music

2014.08.09-TN.Memphis-StaxMuseum-Records-02Rainbow-webSaturday, I visited the Stax Museum of American Soul Music.  It’s been four years since my previous visit, and very little has changed. That’s not necessarily a bad thing.

Following is my 2010 article about the Stax Museum.  As you’ll read, the place is an absolute blast to visit if you have any interest in popular music of the ’60s and ’70s.

The museum tells a great story well, but it offers little incentive for casual fans to visit repeatedly, other than a small room for occasionally-changing exhibits.

Currently, the temporary exhibit offers the chance to see a handful of Grammy Awards (those gold-colored gramophone sculptures handed out by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences) up close and personal.

One thing the museum needs to change: The exhibits have not been updated since the museum’s opening in 2003. Since then, we’ve lost a few of the label’s well-known acts (most notably, Isaac Hayes, who died in 2008) to that great gig in the sky. The exhibits should acknowledge their passings.

Last Train to Soulsville

(Thursday, June 3, 2010 — Memphis TN) The story told by the Stax Museum of American Soul Music is the story of Memphis over the past 60 years.

It’s a story filled with contradictions: a story of racial integration and disintegration, the rise of black pop culture in America, and punctuated by the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

It’s also a story of rags to riches to rags to riches to rags, a rollercoaster of successes and failures so common to the recording industry in the 1960s and ’70s…and to the city of Memphis as well.

2010.06.03-TN.Memphis-StaxMuseum-1-edit

The Stax Museum recreates the look of the original recording studio-cum-movie theater.

The Stax Records Story

In 1957, Jim Stewart and Estelle Axton (both were white employees at a bank) started a recording company (Satellite Records) to record country music by white performers. The initial recording studio was located in Brunswick, a tiny town about 30 miles outside Memphis.

The pair quickly assembled a circle of musicians and producers who had a sharp eye for talent, but the studio’s location was not conducive to recruiting that talent.

In 1960, the studio was relocated to a movie theater in a deteriorating neighborhood near downtown Memphis. The theater’s auditorium became a recording studio, and the candy counter became a record shop that stocked the label’s output.

The area became known as “Soulsville USA” due to the number of performers (from blues singers Memphis Slim and Memphis Minnie to up-and-coming soul superstars like Aretha Franklin, Maurice White and Al Green) who lived in the neighborhood.

Located in such a stewpot of talent, a stream of new acts were discovered by simply walking through the record shop’s doors.

That talent increasingly included black performers and mixed-race bands. One such band, Booker T. and the MGs, became the house band, playing on hundreds of recordings over the next couple of decades.

In 1961, the company’s name was changed from Satellite to Stax (pulled from the owners’ last names, Stewart and Axton), and the legendary house of soul hits was born.

Over the next 15 years, Stax’s stable of popular acts included Otis Redding, Sam and Dave, Wilson Pickett, Rufus and Carla Thomas, the Staple Singers, and Isaac Hayes, along with many others.

The Stax studio’s sloping floor and large space had a dynamic, live sound and became a popular recording destination for non-label acts, including Elvis Presley.

The label’s first stumbles came in 1967-68. The label’s biggest act, Otis Redding, and several members of his band, the Bar-Kays, were killed in a plane crash. This was quickly followed by the ending of a distribution deal with Atlantic Records that cost Stax its back catalog.

At the same time, the label’s music was evolving. Stax’s success had been built on a stable of integrated acts. With the death of Dr. King and the concurrent focus on music specifically aimed at a black audience, tension increased among the label’s acts and staff.

As the ’60s came to a close, Isaac Hayes was moving from a house writer and performer to a lead star. A huge concert in Los Angeles (the Wattstax concert) brought the Stax repertoire to an even bigger audience on the West Coast.

Despite these successes, bad business decisions brought the label to bankruptcy in 1975. The theater-cum-studio was shuttered and eventually bulldozed in 1989.

Isaac Hayes’ gold-plated Cadillac is a popular exhibit at the museum.

Isaac Hayes’ gold-plated Cadillac is a popular exhibit at the museum.

Rebirth of Stax

Fourteen years later, a reconstructed Stax (including a reproduction of the recording studio and record shop) was built, with a new music academy adjacent. The Stax label was relaunched as a source for both archival works and new works by young artists.

The museum tells the story of soul music as represented by Stax. It begins with a 20-minute film about the origins of soul music. The performers in the film talk about the music they listened to growing up: gospel music performed in rural black churches and country music played on white radio stations.

The museum has four centerpiece exhibits: the Hooper’s Chapel Church, built in 1906 and relocated to the museum; the recording studio on a sloping movie auditorium floor; the hall of records, featuring hundreds of 45s and albums; and Isaac Hayes’ gold-plated Cadillac.

In between are a series of multi-media showcases providing a chronological overview of the rise of soul music as a distinct form of popular music. The cases have the typical mix of memorabilia (sheet music, records, promotional fliers, etc.), performer artifacts (costumes, etc.) and audio-visual presentations (interviews, performances).

Everything is clean and professional, but the museum could already use a face-lift. The past several years (the museum opened in May 2003) have seen the death of some of performers, but narrative signs have not been updated. Some of the showcases have had so much material added that the narrative signs are obstructed.

The museum is not entirely comprehensive, viewing “American Soul Music” almost exclusively though a Stax lens. It only occasionally mentions Motown (“Hitsville USA”), it never mentions the Philadelphia Sound (“Philly soul”) which rose as Stax’s fortunes fell, and gives barely a nod to modern soul music or how it relates to rap and hip-hop.

Despite these minor quibbles, the museum is a must-see for any fan of soul music or student of pop music culture. Unfortunately, directional signage to the museum is nearly non-existent after one leaves I-240.

For more about the Stax studio and record label, see the “Stax Records” entry in the Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. For more about the Stax Museum of American Soul Music or to plan a visit, see the museum’s website.

Stax 50 - 50th Anniversary Celebration Box Set

Stax 50 – 50th Anniversary Celebration Box Set

For a satisfying overview of the label’s music and biggest hits, get the 50-track compilation Stax 50 – 50th Anniversary Celebration.

[Motorcycles in Music] My Little Sister’s Gotta Motorbike

Several years before Both Wheels Left the Ground, Crazy Cavan and the Rhythm Rockers had another motorbike themed song.

My Little Sister’s Gotta Motorbike was inspired by the true story that Grogan’s sister was one of the first girls in South Wales with a BSA motorcycle.

BSA was a company as diversified as any of today’s Japanese motorcycle manufacturers.

Birmingham Small Arms began in 1861 as a gun manufacturer in Birmingham, England. In 1880, BSA began producing bicycles, and then motorcycles in 1910.

I remember the BSA bikes as being some of the most graceful-looking of the early-century bikes we displayed at the Art of the Motorcycle in the Memphis Pyramid in 2007.

BSA expanded into the Sunbeam brand of motorcycles, and then into automobiles for a brief period, until that line was merged into a subsidiary of Daimler.

Beginning in the 1960s, BSA struggled in the face of competition from the Japanese brands, and a 1972 merger with Norton and Triumph was the death knell for all three marques. By 1978, the various brands of motorcycles (and guns) were sold.

In the years following, the brands have been revived by successor companies, but today, the original BSA lines of guns and motorbikes are nothing more than a memory.

My Little Sister’s Gotta Motorbike

My little sister’s got a motorbike
See her coming down your way
My little sister’s got a motorbike
It’s a big black BSA
She don’t wanna do the things
That a lady’s supposed to do
My little sister’s got a motorbike
She’s a rocker through an’ through
Rock on!
 
Well, sittin’ in the cafe
Boots across the floor
Talking about the big machines
Parked outside the door
 
My little sister’s got a motorbike
See her coming down your way
My little sister’s got a motorbike
It’s a big black BSA
She don’t wanna do the things
That a lady’s supposed to do
My little sister’s got a motorbike
She’s a rocker through an’ through
Ride in!
 
Well, she won’t wear no ladies dress
No fancy pinafores
Leather jeans and jacket too
That’s my sister’s clothes
 
My little sister’s got a motorbike
See her coming down your way
My little sister’s got a motorbike
It’s a big black BSA
She don’t wanna do the things
That a lady’s supposed to do
My little sister’s got a motorbike
She’s a rocker through an’ through.

by Cavan Grogan © 1977 Carlin Music Corp

[Motorcycles in Music] My Little Sister’s Gotta Motorbike

Several years before Both Wheels Left the Ground, Crazy Cavan and the Rhythm Rockers had another motorbike themed song.

My Little Sister’s Gotta Motorbike was inspired by the true story that Grogan’s sister was one of the first girls in South Wales with a BSA motorcycle.

BSA was a company as diversified as any of today’s Japanese motorcycle manufacturers.

Birmingham Small Arms began in 1861 as a gun manufacturer in Birmingham, England. In 1880, BSA began producing bicycles, and then motorcycles in 1910.

I remember the BSA bikes as being some of the most graceful-looking of the early-century bikes we displayed at the Art of the Motorcycle in the Memphis Pyramid in 2007.

BSA expanded into the Sunbeam brand of motorcycles, and then into automobiles for a brief period, until that line was merged into a subsidiary of Daimler.

Beginning in the 1960s, BSA struggled in the face of competition from the Japanese brands, and a 1972 merger with Norton and Triumph was the death knell for all three marques. By 1978, the various brands of motorcycles (and guns) were sold.

In the years following, the brands have been revived by successor companies, but today, the original BSA lines of guns and motorbikes are nothing more than a memory.

My Little Sister’s Gotta Motorbike

My little sister’s got a motorbike
See her coming down your way
My little sister’s got a motorbike
It’s a big black BSA
She don’t wanna do the things
That a lady’s supposed to do
My little sister’s got a motorbike
She’s a rocker through an’ through
Rock on!
 
Well, sittin’ in the cafe
Boots across the floor
Talking about the big machines
Parked outside the door
 
My little sister’s got a motorbike
See her coming down your way
My little sister’s got a motorbike
It’s a big black BSA
She don’t wanna do the things
That a lady’s supposed to do
My little sister’s got a motorbike
She’s a rocker through an’ through
Ride in!
 
Well, she won’t wear no ladies dress
No fancy pinafores
Leather jeans and jacket too
That’s my sister’s clothes
 
My little sister’s got a motorbike
See her coming down your way
My little sister’s got a motorbike
It’s a big black BSA
She don’t wanna do the things
That a lady’s supposed to do
My little sister’s got a motorbike
She’s a rocker through an’ through.

by Cavan Grogan © 1977 Carlin Music Corp

[Motorcycles in Music] My Little Sister’s Gotta Motorbike

Several years before Both Wheels Left the Ground, Crazy Cavan and the Rhythm Rockers had another motorbike themed song.

My Little Sister’s Gotta Motorbike was inspired by the true story that Grogan’s sister was one of the first girls in South Wales with a BSA motorcycle.

BSA was a company as diversified as any of today’s Japanese motorcycle manufacturers.

Birmingham Small Arms began in 1861 as a gun manufacturer in Birmingham, England. In 1880, BSA began producing bicycles, and then motorcycles in 1910.

I remember the BSA bikes as being some of the most graceful-looking of the early-century bikes we displayed at the Art of the Motorcycle in the Memphis Pyramid in 2007.

BSA expanded into the Sunbeam brand of motorcycles, and then into automobiles for a brief period, until that line was merged into a subsidiary of Daimler.

Beginning in the 1960s, BSA struggled in the face of competition from the Japanese brands, and a 1972 merger with Norton and Triumph was the death knell for all three marques. By 1978, the various brands of motorcycles (and guns) were sold.

In the years following, the brands have been revived by successor companies, but today, the original BSA lines of guns and motorbikes are nothing more than a memory.

My Little Sister’s Gotta Motorbike

My little sister’s got a motorbike
See her coming down your way
My little sister’s got a motorbike
It’s a big black BSA
She don’t wanna do the things
That a lady’s supposed to do
My little sister’s got a motorbike
She’s a rocker through an’ through
Rock on!
 
Well, sittin’ in the cafe
Boots across the floor
Talking about the big machines
Parked outside the door
 
My little sister’s got a motorbike
See her coming down your way
My little sister’s got a motorbike
It’s a big black BSA
She don’t wanna do the things
That a lady’s supposed to do
My little sister’s got a motorbike
She’s a rocker through an’ through
Ride in!
 
Well, she won’t wear no ladies dress
No fancy pinafores
Leather jeans and jacket too
That’s my sister’s clothes
 
My little sister’s got a motorbike
See her coming down your way
My little sister’s got a motorbike
It’s a big black BSA
She don’t wanna do the things
That a lady’s supposed to do
My little sister’s got a motorbike
She’s a rocker through an’ through.

by Cavan Grogan © 1977 Carlin Music Corp